The Making of Salves

A Shaman needs to have the basics of a lot of skills. Being able to Journey to other realms of Awareness is the most important skill, but there are consequences of our daily actions that require us to take care of ourselves, and our Selves, in this Physical Realm.

This also includes an awareness of the need to take care of the beings around us and the planet Herself, and not overloading her with nasty chemicals whenever and wherever we can is part of that awareness.

I am a woman of traditional size … If you’re wondering what a ‘traditional size is, have a squizz at Alexander McCall Smith’s series of books, ‘The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency’.

… and we women of traditional size have underbits that can get all sweaty and rash-y, no matter what the season. In fact most women, and men, have bits that are prone to sweat rashes, and dried-out skin that needs a little TLC.

When I was younger, it didn’t seem to bother me too much, or maybe it did and I’ve conveniently forgotten all about it. I do however, remember that I spent a goodly amount of time and money trying to find a solution to my irritated underbits, and dry skin in winter. They worked for a while but I was never really happy using all sorts of mainstream medical, not to mention ‘inactive, non-medicinal’ ingredients on my skin unless I really, really had to.

Enter, The Salve – Widdershins style!

1 tablespoon of olive oil – doesn’t have to be virginal, but if you’re into virgins, then go for it.

2 tablespoons of coconut oil – or the natural vegetable oil that remains solid at room temperature of your choice.

Tea-tree essential oil.

Lavender essential oil.

All the ingredients you'll need
All the ingredients you’ll need

Gently warm the coconut and olive oil until all the coconut oil is melted. (don’t do this over a direct heat source. It’s overkill, and will burn things, and smell terrible, and create lots of smoke, and the neighbors will call out the fire brigade, and sternly worded emails will be sent to the local newspapers, and your name will be mud and you’ll have to leave town, possibly the country, even the planet) I use a small glass bowl, put the oils in it and then carefully put the glass bowl inside a larger one with hot tap water in it, then let ’em rest until all the little bits of coconut oil are dissolved.

Stubborn little coconut oil bits
Stubborn little coconut oil bits

Then add your essential oils. Start with 5 drops each and then do a bit of a ‘taste test’ on your skin. Increase as desired. I use 20 drops of each essential oil, but that’s just me.

Gently mix the essential oils in to your brew with a wood or ceramic stirrer.

My exclusively designed 'half-peg' stirrer
My exclusively designed ‘half-peg’ stirrer

Pour the mix into a, preferably, glass jar. This recipe will fill this little jar nicely, and doubles up to fill her cousin.

Not-quite-kissin'-cousins
Not-quite-kissin’-cousins

Carefully screw the lids on and stash ’em in your refrigerator until they’re needed.

That’s it.

Use as required and all your itchy underbits will thank you.

You can experiment with other essential oils that are known for their ‘de-irritating of human skin’ properties, but always, ALWAYS, test with a little bit first, because not all skins are salve-able.

Above all else, enjoy yourself as you experiment.

-oOo-

It seems that this week I’m all about D.I.Y. because I have a post up on my Widds Worlds blog about repairing a journal.

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Widdershins

A writer, a lesbian, a feminist, a shaman

7 thoughts on “The Making of Salves”

    1. I’ve been using it all winter on my hands as they get so dry … also my lips as a lip-balm, but I need to experiment with adding some beeswax to the mixture to make it last a little bit longer.

      Liked by 1 person

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